NO LETTERHEAD - 849 Ocean Ave., Santa Monica, CA - TYPEWRITTEN

The Hillside steps in ‘Music Box’ were located on a street off Sunset Blvd., somewhere close to Los Angeles. I doubt if I could locate it now.

Stan Laurel

                JULY 5th.'61.
Dear Tom [Sefton]:
                Thanks yours, June 29th.inst.
Note you got in touch with Blackhawk films - I'd like to suggest, when ordering Silent films, don't order any of the SOUND films that have been converted into SILENT - in other words minus Sound track - without the sound effects & dialogue, they are very disappointing - if you want Silent film be sure you're getting the original Silent Version, as for instance "Flying Elephants" (made before sound.) "Angora Love" etc.
    Re the Hillside steps in "Music Box", they were located on a street off Sunset Blvd, somewhere close to L.A. I doubt if I could locate it now, so many changes have been made since that time - reconstruction, Freeways, etc. probably that section is all built up now & you'd never recognize the spot, most of the surrounding land was vacant property then & the steps were more visual, there were much such locations in those days (Hillside property).
    I frankly don't recall the character that played the Cab Driver in "Double Whoopee", but if the same one that was the Grocer in "Tit for Tat", his name was Charlie Hall, sorry to say Charlie passed on about a couple of years ago, incidentally everyone that appeared in that film has since departed, including Camera man & director. I am the lone survivor.!
    Thanks again Tom of the birthday gift of envelopes - appreciate the thoughtfulness.
    Mrs L. joins in every good wish to self & Family & please convey our best to Ben [Chadwell].
                Sincerely as ever:
Stan Signature                 STAN LAUREL.

Note from the Editor

The original Music Box steps are located at 925 Vendome Street in the Silver Lakes area of Los Angeles, CA. As Stan recalled, they are indeed They are located near the neighborhood where Sunset Boulevard and Silver Lake Boulevard intersect. Not only were they still there in 1961 when Stan wrote this letter, they are still there today.



THE "MUSIC BOX" STEPS - 925 VENDOME ST., LOS ANGELES, CA
The Music Box Steps


OCEANA LETTERHEAD - 849 OCEAN AVE., SANTA MONICA, CA - TYPEWRITTEN

                JULY 7th.'61.
Dear Eric Burkitt:
    Thanks yours,3rd.inst. with enclosure of news item re the old Hippodrome being demolished. (Ardwick Green). I remember playing there in 1910 when it was known as "The Ardwick Empire".
    Interesting to know you live near the Kings Theatre, Longsight, I played there too many years ago on the Broadhead circuit, also the Hippodrome & Floral Garden in Hulme.
    Its sad to see so many of the old Variety houses disappear. Yes, I lived in "Digs" in those days, probably in the streets you mention.
    Regarding my theatrical background - I was born in a theatrical family, so naturally I followed the profession, my Dad (Arthur Jefferson) controlled & operated a circuit of Dramatic houses in the North of Eng. including one in Glasgow, Scotland. (the others around the Tyneside) I started in the business professionally in 1906, a Juvenile Panto Co, the Star was Wee Georgie Wood, no doubt you know of him quite well. Incidently, a book was published here recently, titled "MR LAUREL & MR HARDY", it is now being distributed by the Museum Press or publishing Co. in London, it covers both of our careers, its possible your local library will have a copy. Hope you find it interesting.
    Nice to hear from you again - trust alls well & happy. My regards & best to Mrs B. & self.
    Cheerio & God Bless.
                As ever:
Stan Laurel Signature                 STAN LAUREL.


OCEANA LETTERHEAD - 849 OCEAN AVE., SANTA MONICA, CA - TYPEWRITTEN

                JULY 8th.'61.
Dear Bob & Marie [Hatfield]:
                Thanks yours,4th.inst.
So sorry to hear of your Mother's illness - tell her to CUT THAT OUT.! (we'll 'ave none o'that in our 'ouse.!!).
    No you did'nt 'Goof' on the birthday card - you were WRITE, with EVERSHARP.!! I celebrated my 71st June 16th. didn't feel a day older (than 96.!!).
    Still no improvement in the eye dept. think from now on I'll keep it in my marble bag.! I'd have more use for it.!
    Bye now - All the best from us both here.
                Cheerio:
Stan Laurel Signature                 'The Private EYE'!!


Letter from Stan Laurel to Richard Sloan
OCEANA LETTERHEAD - 849 OCEAN AVE., SANTA MONICA, CA - TYPEWRITTEN

                JULY 12th.'61.
Dear Richard Sloan:
                Thanks yours 7th.inst.
Pleased to know you recd. the book safely which I autographed & returned sometime ago.
    Note you have ambitions to write another book on the subject of L&H with the idea of delving into our private lives - am sorry, but this I would'nt permit under any circumstances, so I'd suggest you just forget it.
    Interesting to know your Father recorded the Academy Award Show - yes I recd. the Danny Kaye segment that Chuck McCann sent me, it was an excellent recording job, I transferred it to Tape for safety.
    My regards & best to Chuck when you see him again.
    Trust alls well with you.
                Sincerely as ever:
Stan Laurel Signature                 STAN LAUREL.


POSTCARD - 849 Ocean Ave., Santa Monica, CA - TYPEWRITTEN

                JULY 21st.'61.
Thanks Edmund [Tester] for note & enclosure - all good advertising matters. Trust alls going well with the Park project - imagine you're plenty busy.
    Again thanks & every good wish to self & family.
    Good luck & God Bless.
                As ever:
Stan Signature                 STAN LAUREL.


OCEANA LETTERHEAD - 849 Ocean Ave., Santa Monica, CA - TYPEWRITTEN

                JULY 26th.'61
Dear Tom [Sefton]:
    Thanks for your card from COWLES,N.M. Appreciated your kind remembrance.
    Hope you all had a wonderful time - am sure the children enjoyed riding the horses.
    My regards & best to you all.
                As ever:
Stan Signature                 STAN LAUREL.


Postcard from Stan Laurel to Bob and Marie Hatfield
POSTCARD - 849 Ocean Ave., Santa Monica, CA - TYPEWRITTEN

                JULY 29th.'61.
Dear Bob & Marie [Hatfield]:
    Thanks yours,25th.inst. Note you'll be in Hollywood for a few days in August - hope for the pleasure we shall be seeing you again - give us a call. (EXbrook 3-5656.) No, do'nt bother to return clippings.
    Mrs L. joins in bestest to you all, pleased to know your Mother is feeling much better.
    Cheerio & God Bless.
                As ever:
Stan Signature                 STAN LAUREL.


Stan Laurel Fan Revives Fat/Thin Duo

Bozo the Clown (Larry Harmon) is changing his voice a bit for his new animated series, Laurel & Hardy, due to be syndicated on TV this fall.
    Harmon has been in love with Laurel & Hardy since he was a kid and has seen so many of the old time comedy films, he knows all of the gestures of the fat man and the head scratching thin man by heart.
    The only way Larry figured he could bring the two back to life was in an animated cartoon series. he wrote some scripts and called the ailing Stan Laurel in Santa Monica, Calif. Harmon can mimic Laurel perfectly and when Laurel got on the phone he thought he was talking to himself. The phone conversation was followed by a meeting with the great man and Harmon produced his scripts plus drawings of the proposed characters. After reading, Stan admitted the script followed the old pattern perfectly.
    Then Larry had dinner with Oliver Hardy’s widow, Lucille, and she glanced over the proposed drawings. “That’s my Babe,” she said with tears in her eyes.
    However Harmon didn’t cinch negotiations just like that. Laurel looked over the whole field carefully and seven months later gave Harmon the O.K. to go on with the series. Laurel liked Harmon's youth, 35, and what he had done with Bozo the Clown, and above all, he said, he liked Harmon's enthusiasm. After listening to Harmon, it’s easy to see why. Most of the time he is imitating Laurel’s high pitched squeaky voice, recalling old lines. And then he goes on and on about typical Laurel and Hardy situations.

—Sunday Independent
    July 23, 1961

Stan Watermark