STAN LAUREL LETTERHEAD - 849 OCEAN AVE., SANTA MONICA, CA - TYPEWRITTEN

                SEPTEMBER 1st.1960.
Dear Herb Read:
                Thanks yours,29th.ult.
Pleased to note you have a tape machine, will send you the Max Miller recording, as soon as I am able to make one for you. There will be no need to return it.
    Re the Puppet idea - are you referring to the hand style or the string marionettes? the reason I ask this, we were approached sometime ago in regard to the marionette style being put on the market & I do'nt know if my attorney has been in negotiation or not, so I would'nt want to commit myself till I check with him on the matter, if we are still in the clear, I should be happy to have you handle the product. Am sending your letter to Mr Shipman & will ask him to contact you - he has managed all the L&H business affairs for over 10 years, so naturally I leave all these matters to him.
    With pleas[ure] I am enclosing you a picture - thank you for the request.
    Mrs L. joins in kindest regards.
                As ever:
Stan Signature                 STAN LAUREL.


OCEANA LETTERHEAD - 849 OCEAN AVE., SANTA MONICA, CA - TYPEWRITTEN

                SEPTEMBER 1st.1960.
My Dear Ben [Shipman]:
    Enclosed is letter from Herbert Read Jr. who I have met a couple of times during his trips out here. He is authoring a book on the life of the late Jean Harlow, & due to her having made her first screen appearance with Babe & I, he wanted to get some details - hence the main reason of his visits.
    He's evidently connected with this Public Relations firm in Philadelphia. In regard to the puppets idea, I told him I would place the matter in your hands.
    I like the idea very much, & I think it would be a profitable venture & worth looking into, it would be good to have these on market for Xmas & the publication of the book.
    Thanks Ben.
    Regards & Best,
                As ever:
Stan Signature

Note from the Editor

Jean Harlow made her screen debut in Laurel and Hardy’s Double Whoopee in 1929.



OCEANA LETTERHEAD - 849 OCEAN AVE., SANTA MONICA, CA - TYPEWRITTEN

                Sept.21st.1960
Dear Herb [Read]:
    [I'm] happy with the Max Miller recording. It turned out pretty good for an amateur job & cheap equipment - hope you enjoy it.
    The speed is 3-3/4 & reverse tape for 2nd.part.
    Hope alls well & happy with [you].
    Regards & best.
                As ever:
Stan Signature                 STAN LAUREL.


OCEANA LETTERHEAD - 849 OCEAN AVE., SANTA MONICA, CA - TYPEWRITTEN

                SEPTEMBER 21st.1960.
Dear Glenn Laxton:
                Thanks yours, 15th.inst.
I had a copy sent me of the article you mention regarding the present Movie situation in Hollywood, it was certainly a big surprise to me seeing I was being credited for those statements - the true fact of the matter, that reporter did call me one morning & asked my views & opinion of the movie business in general - I told him I had'nt been in the business for over 15 years, so of course had no comments as I was not familiar with the conditions of to-day. I also added, 'who cares anyway what I think'?. The conversation did'nt last more than a couple of minutes, so what he wrote, he created himself & took the liberty of using my name as the author. The article embarrased me very much - unfortunately, nothing I can do about it.
    Re making occasional TV appearances - I have'nt the slightest desire - am permanently retired now, so am not even interested - if you had worked for 50 odd years in Show Bus. you'd know what I mean.!
    Wish you lots of good luck in your studies.
    Take care of yourself.
                As ever:
Stan Laurel Signature                 STAN LAUREL.

Note from the Editor

The quotes erroneously attributed to Stan referred to in this letter included, “Modern Hollywood is a shrinking island surrounded by money-grabbing, back-stabbing and too much politics. There is increasing politics in getting jobs because there are fewer movies. And there is the other kind of politics—with performers offering their opinions on national issues as if their opinions were important. Who are they after all? What right have they to impose their thoughts on the public, which certainly knows as much as they do? I think some of our stars are beginning to believe their publicity—they’re taking themselves too seriously. Nobody else does.”



OCEANA LETTERHEAD - 849 OCEAN AVE., SANTA MONICA, CA - TYPEWRITTEN EXCERPT

                SEPTEMBER 24th.'60.
My Dear Ben [Shipman]:
    Re: Anchor Paint Company - the chap that first called me about the job, told me that the job would include the painting inside the rain gutters which run along the roof of the house - said it would avoid rust. This he didn't mention in his bid.


STAN LAUREL LETTERHEAD - 849 OCEAN AVE., SANTA MONICA, CA - TYPEWRITTEN

                SEPTEMBER 27th.1960.
Dear Carol Ann Tone:
                Thank you for your very nice letter.
I am pleased to know you enjoy seeing the Laurel & Hardy films on TV & get so much pleasure out of them.
    Again my sincere thanks Mr Preece - I greatly value your friendly concern.
    Am sending you a little picture, thought you might like to have one as a souvenir.
    My love & best wishes to you too.
                Sincerely always:
Stan Laurel Signature                 STAN LAUREL.


OCEANA LETTERHEAD - 849 OCEAN AVE., SANTA MONICA, CA - TYPEWRITTEN

I was surprised to know [Marcel Marceau] was back in this country. His miming is excellent.

Stan Laurel

                SEPTEMBER 27th.1960.
Dear Marie Hatfield:
    Sorry delay in acknowledging your previous & recent letter - fact is, a couple of months ago, some simple minded columnist in New York, made a statement that I was very ill & I would like to hear from friends & fans - I am still trying to get through answering all those letters of sympathy - needless to tell you I could kill that guy for causing me all this work for no good reason at all. Due to all this, my personal correspondence was sadly neglected & now I am faced with a big stack of this - am dizzy pounding away at this typewriter, so please excuse my brief reply.
    Thanks for the clipping re Marcel Marceau, I was surprised to know he was back in this Country, I have'nt heard from him for quite sometime. This show "The Cloak", I saw him do in Paris in 1950, I see it is referred to as 'The Overcoat', - his miming is excellent in this, he is supported by his little company, all specially trained by him, its amazing to see the precision of movement, perfect timing - too bad you could'nt have seen the show in San Francisco.
    Mrs L. joins in regards & best to your Mother, Bob & self.
    Trust alls well.
                As ever:
Stan Laurel Signature                 STAN LAUREL.

The New York Times Reported

“The Overcoat” (a wordless adaptation of Nikolai Gogol’s story), which Mr. Marceau created in 1951, suggests an Edvard Munch painting softened into a series of more gently Expressionistic storybook panels. As Akakia Akakievitch, Gogol’s waifish office clerk who works himself to the bone for 10 years to purchase the fur coat of his dreams, only to have it stolen, Mr. Marceau becomes a figure of abject pathos. In the piece’s most striking moments, the dream of a luxurious overcoat becomes a nightmare of desire in which the character is surrounded by giant fur coats that come alive.



Stan Watermark