HAL ROACH STUDIOS MEMO - TYPEWRITTEN

MEMORANDUM OF PICTURES COVERED BY PARTICIPATION CLAUSE

                February 25, 1924

B-6 - Smithy -
           Percentage Applicable: 12-1/2%
L-7 - Zeb vs. Paprika -
           Percentage Applicable: 12-1/2%
L-8 - Postage Due -
           Percentage Applicable: 12-1/2%
L-9 - Brothers Under The Chin -
           Percentage Applicable: 12-1/2%
x L-10 - Wild Bill Hiccup -
           Percentage Applicable: 12-1/2%
x L-11 - Rupert of Hee-Haw -
           Percentage Applicable: 12-1/2%
x L-12 - Kilts -
           Percentage Applicable: 12-1/2%


x = Pictures on Hand and not yet accepted.

                Signatures:
                WARREN DOANE
Stan Laurel Signature

AUTOGRAPHED PHOTO TO CARL KIMBALL - 1924
Autographed Photo to Carl Kimball - 1924


HAL ROACH STUDIOS LETTERHEAD - Culver City, CA - TYPEWRITTEN

                Los Angeles, California
                February 8th, 1924

By mutual consent the contract between the undersigned parties dated March 2nd, 1923, is, except as expressly noted below, hereby cancelled and terminated, such cancellation and termination to be effective at the close of the present week; to wit, on February 9th, 1924.
    It is mutually understood that such cancellation and termination shall not affect the right of the undersigned, Stanley Laurel, to participate pursuant to Paragraph TENTH of said contract in the profits of pictures produced under said contract in which he shall have taken the leading part, nor affect the terms of the supplemental contract between the same parties dated December 12th, 1923.
                HAL E. ROACH STUDIOS
                By H.E. ROACH, President
                And C.H. ROACH, Secretary

                Yours truly,
Stan Laurel Signature

NO LETTERHEAD - TYPEWRITTEN EXCERPT

                Beverly Hills, California
                March 8th, 1924.

Hal Roach Studios, Inc.,
Culver City, California.

Gentlemen:
    Prior to my notification to you that I was unable to render services for you, and the subsequent notice of suspension which you have given me, I have appeared, at your direction, in a photoplay of Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios.
    I have been advised that, in connection with the completion of the picture, retakes and added scenes are necessary, which I believe will take one or two days shooting and, in view of the fact that this work has been practically completed, except as above indicated, I feel it my obligation and duty to do my best to appear therein and finish this work, and have so stated to Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios, and, in view of the fact that it involves only the completion of some work to the extent of a day to two of my services, I would not wish to receive any compensation.
    I shall construe your approval upon the line therefore provided as your permission for me to so appear, subject to the terms thereof, and I shall very much appreciate such actions on your part.
                Yours truly,
Stan Laurel Signature
APPROVED:
HAL ROACH STUDIOS, INC.



STAN LAUREL COMEDIES LETTERHEAD - TYPEWRITTEN

                Somerset Apartments
                6075 Franklin Avenue
                Hollywood, California
                April 7th. '24.

Dear Mr [Warren] Doane,
    I shall be pleased if you would give me some information regarding the participation due me, also as to whether 'KILTS' and 'RUPERT OF HEE HAW' have been accepted or not.
    Awaiting your favour, best wishes,
Stan Laurel Signature

STAN LAUREL IN "MANDARIN MIX-UP" - 1924
Stan Laurel Plays a Chinese Laundryman in “Mandarin Mix-Up”


Absurdity of Face and Acts—Laurel’s Forte

Little did Stan Laurel think several years ago when he came to this country from Merrie England as a member of Fred Karno’s vaudeville act, “A Night in a London Music Hall,” that he would be one of the bright and shining lights of motion-picture comedy. Laurel is now one of Hal Roach’s stars, and his comedies have given him plenty of room in which to sparkle.
    The Laurel brand of screen nonsense is a combination of fine burlesque and pure absurdity. In three of his recent two-reel subjects he built up screamingly funny travesties of well-known feature productions and appears to have entered into a field in which he has no competition.
    Laurel’s keen sense of values has made possible a new and welcome type of motion-picture comedies. From time to time burlesques of current screen successes have been brought out, but no comedian but Laurel has seen the possibilities in this line of work.
    For general all-around nonsense Laurel easily wins the palm. It may not appear to be strikingly original to hitch a horse to a sulky, wrong end to, but as is done on the screen in a comedy to be released soon it is a high point of fun. Laurel’s personality and his utterly inane grin have much to do with “putting over” such bits of business and it is to these two possessions that he undoubtedly owes his success.

—Los Angeles Times
    January 20, 1924

Stan Watermark