OCEANA LETTERHEAD - 849 Ocean Ave., Santa Monica, CA - TYPEWRITTEN

                JUNE 1st.'63.
Dear Jenny & Jack [Racey]:
            Thanks yours, 27th.ult. Glad you like the snapshot - but you should see me when the Sun's shining, I'm really magnificent!
    Note Dave is back home again & keeping busy with his clothing establishment - hope he'll recoup his Garden losses - yes you told me his Son Howard works for Lincoln & his younger one was due home on furlough from the Navy.
    I imagine you miss the Theraphy Jack, you had a lot of faith in it - maybe you could figure out exercises for yourself like standing upside down with a finger in a bottle - let me know if you are interested - I've got a million ideas you could work on, another one is that dance routine where you have to bend backwards & go under a bamboo pole you've probably seen it on TV sometime or other, thats very exciting, you have to have music of course to give you tempo & rythm - Jennie could play her Zither.! sounds good does'nt it? think I'll try it myself.
    Re your idea to move to Florida or Calif. I imagine the Help situation is just as bad, its pretty difficult to know what to do - maybe an apartment would make things easier, theres a lot of work to be taken care of with a house & garden - you'd probably miss the garden tho' if you moved into an Apt. you could of course get some flower pots & sit out on the window ledge, get lots of Sun & fresh air.!!
    Did you hear this one?: "I heard your wife collectas Goldfish & keeps them in the Bath tub" -
    'Yes, she has about three dozen of them'
    "What does she do with them when she wants to take a bath - does she take them out?"
    'No, she blindfolds 'em.!!
    Think thats all.
    Bestest to you & Yours from us both here.
                As always:
Stan Signature                 STAN LAUREL.



OCEANA LETTERHEAD - 849 Ocean Ave., Santa Monica, CA - TYPEWRITTEN

Frankly, I don’t care for any of the Laurel and Hardy 20th Century Fox films. It was a very unhappy experience for us.

Stan Laurel

                JUNE.3rd.'63.
Dear Dean Kaner:
    Thanks yours,27th.ult. nice to hear from you again & to know alls well.
    Frankly, I do'nt care for any of the L&H 20th Century Fox films, it was a very unhappy experience for us - anyway thats water under the bridge now.
    Note you finished school & will now take a typing course - have you made your vacation plans?
    I have no postcard of the hotel here, but am enclosing a brochure which will give you a rough idea of the place, I have an apt. on the front, directly facing the Ocean - very pleasant view - on the brochure picture I marked an X denoting this Apt.
    Not much new to tell you Dean.
    Again my best to yourself & Family.
                Good luck - As always:
Stan Laurel Signature                 STAN LAUREL.


OCEANA LETTERHEAD - 849 Ocean Ave., Santa Monica, CA - TYPEWRITTEN

We didn’t speak any dialogue in the silent films, but occasionally would speak the prepared subtitles.

Stan Laurel

                JUNE.7th.'63.
Dear Bob Stowell:
    Thanks your nice letter recd. this AM - indeed nice to hear from you & to know the old L&H films are still affording you so much pleasure - appreciate very much your kind sentiments. Pleased you enjoyed the L&H book & found it interesting.
    No we did'nt speak any dialogue in the silent films, but occasionally would speak the prepared titles (sub titles).
    Enclosed a little picture - thought you might like to have one as a souvenir.
    My kindest regards & every good wish,
                Sincerely always:
Stan Laurel Signature                 STAN LAUREL.

P.S. Note you are collecting L&H films - no doubt you know of Blackhawk Films,1235, W.5th.St. Davenport. Iowa. & have their catalogue listing.?


OCEANA LETTERHEAD - 849 Ocean Ave., Santa Monica, CA - TYPEWRITTEN

                JUNE 8th.'63.
Dear Irene [Heffernan]:
            W E L C O M E   H O M E.!
Many thanks for the Cards en route - am sure you & Jim had a glorious time - especially in HONOLULU & Waikiki -
    Enclosed a few stamps I recd. since you left - some new ones I think.
    I guess you are both tired out & will enjoy being back home again to relax & rest.
    Eda joins in love & kind thoughts to you both,
                As always:
Stan Signature                 STAN LAUREL.

P.S. Babe [London] visited with us this afternoon, she is going to Palm Springs over the weekend with a friend - Babe looks very well.!


POSTCARD - 849 Ocean Ave., Santa Monica, CA - TYPEWRITTEN

                JUNE 10th.'63.
Thanks Johnny [Municino] for Birthday greetings - appreciate your kind remembrance & good wishes. I celebrate my 73rd. on the 16th. for no reason at all - you know Johnny, this World is made up of all kinds of people - am sure glad I'm not one of 'em.! Hope you're making improvement - love & bestest to Mary, Self & Sir Albert the Lionhearted from us both here. Take care - God Bless.
                As always:
Stan Signature                 STAN LAUREL.


OCEANA LETTERHEAD - 849 Ocean Ave., Santa Monica, CA - TYPEWRITTEN

                JUNE 10th.1963.
My Dear Leo Riemens:
                Thanks yours, 25th.ult.
Thanks yours,2nd.inst. covering interesting data on the old L&H films. Yes Eugene Pallette made several minor appearances in the Hal Roach Comedies - in between his regular film feature commitments, he enjoyed the change of pace playing inconsequential parts in comedies, he was very well liked on the Roach lot. Note our films shown on Television are uninterrupted by advertising commercials & are shown in their original length - over here we do'nt fare so well unfortunately. Re "Midnight Patrol" No Dick Cramer did'nt play the Chief of Police, that was Anders Randolph.
    In "Our Relations" the wives were played by Daphne Pollard (Mrs Hardy) & Betty Healy (Mrs Laurel) Iris Adrian played one of the girls in the cafe (Alan Hale's Inn) I do'nt remember the name of the other girl - it probably is Lona Andre. I do'nt remember the Girls names who played in "Men O'War" either. The Houseboat film you mention, I think was a One Reeler I made for Hal Roach, titled "Save the Ship".
    "Duck Soup" I believe was the silent version of "Their First Mistake". The Lady character (Society Type) you mention - I know who you are referring to, but I can't think of her name, I think her last name was 'Van de Vere' or something similar to that, Anita Garvin occasionally played these roles too - Rosemary Theby also played these parts. Anyway, I'll try & find out for you & will let you know later. Please do'nt feel you are boring me with these questions, am happy to help you - I appreciate your kindly interest & sentiments very much - please do'nt hesitate to call on me anytime you are in doubt.
    Again my kindest regards & every good wish.
    Very sincerely:
                As always:
Stan Laurel Signature                 STAN LAUREL.

Note from the Editor

Well, Wikipedia had nothing on Stan. His memory was pretty amazing! It really is astonishing that he could even attempt to come up with names from films he made almost four decades before he sat down at the typewriter to write this letter. So, how did he do? Eugene Pallette (1889–1954) was an American actor who appeared in over 240 silent era and sound era motion pictures between 1913 and 1946. An overweight man with a deep voice, Pallette is probably best-remembered in his role as Friar Tuck in The Adventures of Robin Hood (1938). He appeared with Laurel and Hardy in films like, The Second Hundred Years and The Battle Of The Century (both in 1927). Anders Randolph played the chief of police in Night Owls (1930) not Midnight Patrol (1933). The police chief in that film was played by Frank Brownlee. Stan got the wives right in Our Relations (1936). Ditto for naming Iris Adrian and Lona Andre as two of the girls in that same film. The girls in Men O’War (1929) were played by Anne Cornwall and Gloria Greer. Save The Ship was, indeed, a 1923 Stan Laurel solo one-reeler. The ‘Society Type’ in Duck Soup (1927) was played by Madeline Hurlock. That film was remade as Another Fine Mess (1930) not Their First Mistake.



OCEANA LETTERHEAD - 849 Ocean Ave., Santa Monica, CA - TYPEWRITTEN

                JUNE 10th.'63.
Dear Mike [Polacek]:
    Enclosed letter I mentioned in my last from Leo Riemens, in Den Haag, Holland - thought you'd find this interesting - it seems our films are sold over there in bits & pieces, & the collectors have to put them together themselves - like a jigsaw puzzle, but I think Leo has a friend over here who gets the regular length films from Blackhawk & ships them over, so I guess he has quite a good collection - if you feel like dropping him a line, am sure he'd be delighted to hear from you, especially having so much in common.
    Trust alls going well Mike - no doubt you recd. the film case & stills by now.
    Bestest to you & Yours from us both here.
                As always:
Stan Signature                 STAN LAUREL.


POSTCARD - 849 Ocean Ave., Santa Monica, CA - TYPEWRITTEN

                JUNE 10th.'63.
Thanks your letter, 3rd.inst. Yes I knew Mr John McCabe before he wrote the book, we met in England. Sorry to tell you Jimmy Finlayson died in 1953. Yes, I know Groucho Marx also Spanky McFarlane.
    Note you got another L&H comic book, I think that's the 3rd.issue to date (the one riding the motorcycle & side car)
    Nice to hear from you again Tim [Dalton]. Have a good vacation.
    My best wishes,
                Sincerely:
Stan Laurel Signature                 STAN LAUREL.


LAUREL AND HARDY COMIC BOOK - JUNE 1963
Laurel and Hardy Comic Book


POSTCARD - 849 Ocean Ave., Santa Monica, CA - TYPEWRITTEN

                JUNE 14th.'63.
Dear Leo [Riemens]:
    Re the Lady you asked about : was is Charlotte Minneau, she played the Society character in many films.
    Just a guess.!
                All the best -
Stan Laurel Signature                 STAN LAUREL.

Note from the Editor

Charlotte Mineau played the “Society” character in Love ’em and Weep and Sugar Daddies (both in 1927), not Duck Soup (also in 1927). That part was was played by Madeline Hurlock.



POSTCARD - 849 Ocean Ave., Santa Monica, CA - TYPEWRITTEN

                JUNE 14th.1963.
Thanks Arthur [Westwood] your letter recd. this AM. conveying Birthday greetings - appreciate your kind remembrance. Think it best you give me a call when you arrive in Redondo, so we can arrange a convenient date - my phone is EXbrook 3-5656.
    Again my thanks & every good wish.
                Sincerely always:
Stan Laurel Signature                 STAN LAUREL.


Postcard from Stan Laurel to Randy Johnson
POSTCARD - 849 Ocean Ave., Santa Monica, CA - TYPEWRITTEN

                JUNE 15th.'63.
Thanks Randy [Johnson] for the nice B'day greeting card - appreciate very much your kind remembrance.
    Again my thanks & bestest to you.
                Sincerely as always:
Stan Laurel Signature                 STAN LAUREL.


Postcard from Stan Laurel to Dean Kaner
POSTCARD - 849 Ocean Ave., Santa Monica, CA - TYPEWRITTEN

                JUNE 15th.'63.
Thanks Dean [Kaner] for your nice B'day greetings - appreciate your kind remembrance & good wishes.
    Trust alls well & happy with you & yours,
    Take care - God Bless.
                As always:
Stan Laurel Signature                 STAN LAUREL.


POSTCARD - 849 Ocean Ave., Santa Monica, CA - TYPEWRITTEN

I just turned 73. I turned the wrong way!

Stan Laurel

                JUNE 17th.'63.
Thanks Ron [Maher] for the nice birthday greetings - appreciate very much your kind remembrance - I just turned 73.!! I turned the wrong way.!
    Again my thanks & bestest.
                Sincerely as ever:
Stan Laurel Signature                 STAN LAUREL.


POSTCARD - 849 Ocean Ave., Santa Monica, CA - TYPEWRITTEN

                JUNE 20th.'63.
Many thanks [Bob Stowell] for the nice B'day greetings - appreciate very much your kind remembrance.
    Just turned 73.!! I turned the wrong way, did'nt I?? !! Again my thanks & bestest.
    Trust alls well.
                Very sincerely:
Stan Laurel Signature                 STAN LAUREL.


OCEANA LETTERHEAD - 849 Ocean Ave., Santa Monica, CA - TYPEWRITTEN

                JUNE 20th.'63.
Dear Mike [Polacek],
                Thanks yours,17th.inst.
So sorry I missed your call last Sunday - we did go out for dinner that evening, the little French restaurant a couple of blocks from here on Ocean Ave. & Santa Monica Blvd. - wish I'd known that you were going to call, could have easily waited.
    Anyway, hope the friends & fans were'nt too disappointed - appreciate very much the kind thought & gesture. Well I turned 73. (I turned the wrong way I guess.!).
    I had a letter & card from Ed Kobus, told me you had sent him a snapshot, he mentioned too he was unable to get a copy of "This is Your Life" film for you for some reason or other - I told him not to bother as I was sending you my print as you found a firm in K.C. who would do the reprint for you - incidently , Walter Eccles called me last Sunday, said he had recd. the film & would ship it to you the first part of this week, hope by now you recd. it okay - I suggest Mike you look at the film first before you decide on getting a copy, I have no idea what the cost is, but frankly I think its a waste of money, its not worth while, however whatever you wish is okay with me.
    Pleased you got the stills I autographed for you - no I do'nt need the letter I sent you from Mr Riemens of Holland, if you're through with it, you can destroy or keep.
    I'll convey your best to Joe when I see him again, I assume he returned your prints of "Two Tars" & "Big Business" - I enjoyed seeing them again. Note you ordered "Love & Hisses" (silent) & "Love 'em & Weep" (silent) from an outfit in Hollywood - whats their name & address? I often get requests for dealers addresses. I scratched my ankle (instep) about a week ago on the shower door, it developed an infection - Dr is treating it - special ointment, penecilin tablets etc. trying to heal the dam thing) the sugar situation makes it difficult) thats the trouble being a Diabolic!!!
    Bye Mike, bestest from us both here to your kind self & family - trust you are all well in health.
    God Bless.
                as always:
Stan Signature                 STAN LAUREL.

Note from the Editor

Mike Polacek of Huntington, WV, was Laurel and Hardy’s self proclaimed “No. 1 Fan.” In 1963, he spent five days visiting with Stan. He also recorded some of their telephone conversations, and one of them was highlighted in an issue of Classic Images magazine.



SNAPSHOT PHOTOS - MIKE POLACEK - 1963
Mike Polacek and Stan Laurel


Letter from Stan Laurel to Steven Zaharoff
OCEANA LETTERHEAD - 849 Ocean Ave., Santa Monica, CA - TYPEWRITTEN

                JUNE 22nd.'63.
Dear Steven Zaharoff:
    Thanks your interesting letter, 20th.inst. Congratulations on your excellent report card - wish you continued success in your studies. Note you have the film "Big Business" hope you will get lots of pleasure out of it, there is another that Blackhawk carry - "Leave 'em Laughing" - think you'd enjoy this one, we are involved in a traffic tie up at an intersection.
    The 'Record American' article you mention is ridiculous, I am not suffering from a heart condition - I suffered a slight stroke in 1955 - maybe that is what they are referring to - the autobiography they mention is probably the book that was published sometime ago by John McCabe - "Mr Laurel & Mr Hardy", published by Doubleday, Inc. N.Y.C. they sure must be short of news to have to fill in news space with this type of misinformation, just a lot of nonsense.
    Wish you a happy vacation in camp Steven, am sure you'll have a wonderful time.
    Take good care of yourself - Good Luck!
                As always:
Stan Signature                 STAN LAUREL.


Postcard from Stan Laurel
POSTCARD - 849 Ocean Ave., Santa Monica, CA - TYPEWRITTEN

                JUNE 28th.'63.
Thanks yours 26th.inst. with enclosure of news clipping - this information is'nt true, I fortunately have never had a heart attack & I am not writing my biography, it just a lot of irresponsible nonsense. Suggest you write to Groucho Marx in C/O of Screen Actors Guild, 7750, SUNSET BLVD. HOLLYWOOD 46. CALIF. your letter will be forwarded to him. Dennis King I believe in New York & still active. Do'nt know anything about the animated cartoons when or where they will be shown on TV.
    My regards & best -
                In haste:
Stan Signature                 STAN LAUREL.

Note from the Editor

Dennis King (1897-1971) was an English actor and singer. He emigrated to the U.S. in 1921 and went on to a successful career on the Broadway stage, in motion pictures and on television.



POSTCARD - 849 Ocean Ave., Santa Monica, CA - TYPEWRITTEN

                JUNE 28th.'63.
Thanks Anthony [Amato] for the nice card conveying B'day greetings - appreciated very much your kind thought so kindly expressed.
    My regards & bestest to you & yours,
    Very sincerely:
                As always -
Stan Laurel Signature                 STAN LAUREL.


POSTCARD - 849 Ocean Ave., Santa Monica, CA - TYPEWRITTEN

                JUNE 28th.'63.
Thanks Clifford for the belated B'day greeting - appreciate very much your kind thought & good wishes. Trust alls well & happy with you -
    My regards & best -
                As always:
Stan Laurel Signature                 STAN LAUREL.


Letter from Stan Laurel to Douglas Solomon
STAN LAUREL LETTERHEAD - 849 Ocean Ave., Santa Monica, CA - TYPEWRITTEN

                JUNE 29th.'63
Dear Douglas Solomon:
    Thank you for your very nice letter recd. this AM. Indeed nice to hear from you & to know the old L&H films are still affording you so much pleasure - appreciate very much your kind sentiments so graciously expressed - again thank you Douglas.
    Regarding "Flying Deuces" film, most of this was made in the studio, the flying field & Hangars, were made at a small local airport in the L.A. area. The scenes were we did the laundry washing for the Regiment were done in Chatsworth, Calif.
    Again my thanks & best wishes to you & your family.
                Sincerely always:
Stan Laurel Signature                 STAN LAUREL.


NO LETTERHEAD - HANDWRITTEN

                JUNE 30, 1963
Dear Stan:
    I have a one reel version of what must be "Near Dublin," the comedy about Old Ireland of 1924. Jimmie Finlayson is your foe, but who was the blonde leading lady? I think she was also In "The Soilers."


    The Lady was Miss Ena Gregory, I haven't seen or heard of her since.

    "We Faw Down" of 1928. Who are the two girls who play your and Mr. Hardy's wives? They look so familiar to me, and yet I cannot place them.

    These two ladles were Vera White and Kay Deslys.

    "Double Whoopee." Everybody is asking who played the Prince there, that magnificent take-off on Stroheim. Till I hit upon the idea that It was Lucien Prival. Am I right?

    This chap was actually Eric Von Stroheim's stand-in Double. I never knew his name.

    "You're Darn Tooting." Is the conductor there Snitz Edwards? I feel sure about it.

    No, this wasn't Snitz Edwards. I know the name well but can't think of it (I think Otto Lederer was his name).

    One of the most famous "Two Tars." Who were the two girls there?

    I don't remember.

    I spotted Stanley Sanford as the husband of Anita Garvin In "From Soup to Nuts." But the tiny housemaid, was she Edna Marion or Marjorie White?

    Edna Marion.

    And now the big surprise. I have a two-reel Hal Roach comedy called "Forty Minutes from Hollywood" which must be of 1926, and has no cast, except for Glenn Tryon as the star.

    I don't recall ever being in this film or directing it, the only time I appeared with Tryon was In "Near Dublin," he played a small part.

    I have a feeling that you may have directed this, as you are in anonymously, and so is Mr. Hardy. Yet the film Is not mentioned In John McCabe's book.

    This was not an L&H film!

    What was the title of that old film, shown in "When Comedy was King," where you try to sell things at the gate of a deal-dumb institution? Also what was the name of the film (without Mr. Hardy) located in a laundry?

    The L&H segment in "When Comedy was King" was from "Big Business" (Selling Xmas Trees). The deal & dumb Institute was in an early Silent I made before Hardy & I teamed. The Laundry was titled "Collars & Cuffs" a Roach-Pathe one-reeler.

Note from the Editor

Opera critic Leo Riemans wrote to Stan with some questions. Stan supplied the answers on the same piece of paper that Leo wrote the questions on, writing between Leo’s lines.



The Best Comedy

By Hal Humphrey

The best comedy on television these days is bootlegged to us late at night or in the afternoons via reruns of old Laurel and Hardy comedies, Jackie Gleason’s Honeymooners, and the W. C. Fields feature films.
    When a bronze plaque honoring Laurel and Hardy was removed from the about to be demolished Hal Roach lot last week and donated to the Hollywood Museum, Stan Laurel was moved to thank museum president Sol Lesser “for your efforts to preserve the best of our rapidly-disappearing past.”

—Beckley Post-Herald
    June 19, 1963

The Dick Van Dyke Show

Dick Van Dyke

Dick’s second season on CBS-TV won’t have any change of format. “We’ll go ahead as we’ve been doing,” he said. “Sometime about September, I’ll have to take off again. I’m going to do another movie, ‘I Love Louisa.’”
    Asked about his current film, Bye Bye Birdie, which was made from the stage play in which he appeared on Broadway, he said: “I haven’t seen the movie, but I understand from people who have seen both, that the stage play was better than the film. The film producers left out many songs that had become popular from the play. I never could understand why. Then they took the teen part and blew it way up. It was unfortunate, but the studio bought the title and the songs, so they could do as they wanted. It was all theirs. I don't think, though, I’ll ever go to see it.”
    A reference to reruns on TV suggested a question about his favorites as far as his own series is concerned, and he thought the one with the burglar was the most fun. “We ran about 15 minutes over,” he said, “and then had a difficult time cutting the thing. It wasn'’t like the script at all, we ad-libbed half of it.”
    The episode in which Dick imitated Stan Laurel is another of his favorites, but Laurel had a slight fault or two to find. “After I had taped the show, I called Stan and told him it would be on and asked him to look at it. When the show was over, I called him again and asked what he thought of it. ‘It was the best imitation of me I’ve ever seen,’ Stan said, ‘but if you had called me before you produced it, I would have made a few suggestions.
    ‘You shouldn’t have worn heels. I never did. I didn’t like the cut of your suit. If you had called me, I would have let you take one of my old ones. Your French cuffs should have been tied on with string. Mine were. then there was the hair...But, of course, I couldn’t expect you to get it cut like mine. Regardless, you did a good job.’”
    And that’s what Dick is striving for as he moves from the movie, Mary Poppins, to his TV show, to the other movie, and keeps “floating” a promise to do a show at the Sahara in Las Vegas. He’s one of Hollywood’s busiest stars.

—Deseret News and Telegram
    June 23, 1963

Stan Watermark