THE QUEENS HOTEL LETTERHEAD - Birmingham, England - HANDWRITTEN

                MARCH.11th.'54.
My Dear Booth [Colman]-
                Thanks yours 4th.inst.
Hope a deal has been settled by now for the Shaw play & to your better interest, but be careful to be in a position to be available in case you get the opportunity to be cast in the picture "Josefa" which I feel would be of more value to you than the Shaw show, especially if it was as important part. One good picture will do you more good than ten shows - quoting Roach - "You know what I mean!"
    However - I am very happy to know that prospects are looking so bright for you - you certainly deserve a real break. Ben Shipman should be here soon now - we have an offer of a tour in Belgium & Greece in a Big Revue (just to do our act). It may not be the one that we are doing now, as the have some pantomime idea for us. It is a splendid offer financially (in $) so Ben is coming over to look into it. They want us to open in May, which is perfect for us. Will let you know as soon as I know definite. Nothing further on the Roach deal so far, but he has asked Ben to try & make a deal with us. We are playing in Wolverhampton this week but staying in B'ham. (15 mile drive each way, every night). Weather warm & sunny - a treat after the last few weeks of cold.
    All for now Booth-
    Love from Eda-
                As ever -
Stan Signature

THE QUEENS HOTEL LETTERHEAD - Birmingham, England - HANDWRITTEN

                March 12th.'54.
Dear Leslie Link-
    Thank you for your very kind letter of the 10th.inst. We certainly appreciate your nice thoughts & wishes. It is indeed a pleasure to know that you have enjoyed our Cinema & Stage appearances for so long now - your mention of "BONNIE SCOTLAND" brought back some happy memories to us (made 21 years ago).
    Doubt if we will make any more Cinema Pictures as the TV in the States is the most important now - especially for comedians, so we shall be making short subjects for that medium, which of course - in time will be seen over here. Many thanks for the interesting copies of Calendar Plates - got a big kick out of them.
    Our kind regards & best wishes.
                Sincerely-
Stan Laurel Signature                 Laurel & Hardy.


NO LETTERHEAD - TYPEWRITTEN

                Palace Theatre,
                GRIMSBY.ENG.
                March 30th.'54.

My Dear Booth [Colman]-
                Thanks your welcome letter 19th.inst.
Sorry to note the Shaw play deal has'nt been settled yet. I too, hope it does'nt fade out after all the hard work that has been put into it so far & the big success it was. However, that's seems to he Hollywood - all discussion & no action - they get hot on an idea, then talk so long about it that it begins to go cold & they throw it out.
    Interesting to hear that you had an interview with Dick Powell, certainly hope something develops, as you say, being a [Howard] Hughes epic, it could be a very long run.
    Ben Shipman arrived & checked on the Holland - Belgium & Greece deal. It did'nt look so good as they had pictured it. First, could'nt guarantee getting Dollars out, then Ben discovered several Niggers in the Woodpile - so, that's OUT.
    We are not going to continue with Delfont, but may play a couple of extra weeks for him after Edinburgh (April 12th.) Have had an offer to play a Twelve weeks run in Blackpool (Big sea - side resort here) starting end of June. Sounds good, so Ben is now in London, checking on that, also an offer to make a picture. He may fly to Australia & look over the situation there, as soon as things are settled here. Will keep you posted re what happens.
    All for now Booth. Eda joins in love & best.
    Bye & Bless.
                Haste-
Stan Signature

Note from the Editor

Richard Ewing “Dick” Powell (1904-1963) was an American singer, actor, film producer, film director and studio head. He was the first actor to portray the private detective Philip Marlowe on screen in Murder, My Sweet (1944).

The expression Stan uses to describe the Holland, Belgium and Greece deal is a dated American figure of speech meaning “some fact of considerable importance that is not disclosed.”



Stan Watermark