STAN LAUREL LETTERHEAD - 1111 Franklin Ave., Santa Monica, CA - TYPEWRITTEN

Glad to tell you, I never felt better, I now weigh 149 and look like my old self again.

Stan Laurel

                Dec.6th.'51.
Dear Betty [Healy]-
    Many thanks for your welcome letter of Nov. 30th. Sorry to note you have'nt been feeling so good, but as you say, it is caused by inactivity & I think your only solution is to get a Job & keep busy and get yourself in to a position to attain the things you desire, something to look forward to instead of sitting down brooding. I have done the same thing all through my illness & I know what it does to your Morale, it really gets you down.
    It was interesting to read about your friends that own a trailer court & seeing Bert Wheeler in the Holtz show, but I don't think they should have felt so bad about Bert. He is well fixed and could buy a dozen trailer courts. I have seen him on Television several times & he is terrific - he has aged, naturally, but still a great performer & I think he never will quit the business as long as has his health, he is a real dyed in the wool & would be very unhappy with anything else. Like myself, if I had to leave show Business I would look forward to Lillies.
    Glad to tell you, I never felt better, I now weigh 149 and look like my old self again & expect to leave for England in February for personal appearances also Television shorts over there. Needless to tell you I can't wait to get back in [the] harness again. To be very frank I never thought I would, last year at this time I weighed only 110 lbs. I shall know definitely next week re the trip so of course will let you know.
    Thanks for the color picture, think it turned out very good & you look very well. Is that a Cocker Spaniel you're holding? It sure is a cute dog. Glad you had a nice thanksgiving in Bakersfield, too bad the dinner dept. wasn't so good. It's always best to eat home on those occasions. The restaurants are generally bad on those Festive days, altho, I have been used to a Turkey sandwich in the dressing room for Xmas and thought it was swell.
    Well Betty, will close now. Am busy digging up a new act to take over, know you understand.
    With kind thoughts to Wayne & self,
                As ever:-
Stan Signature

STAN LAUREL LETTERHEAD - 1111 Franklin Ave., Santa Monica, CA - TYPEWRITTEN

We are leaving for England end of January, due in London February 3rd. So as you can imagine I am up to my neck in preparation—a million and one things to do.

Stan Laurel

                December 17th.'51.
Dear Betty [Healy]-
    Many thanks for the lovely Xmas Card also you letter of the 10th.inst. Glad you are feeling brighter. You should'nt let silly people's chatter get you down, tell them next time, you're not [a] Wailing Wa11. I guess you heard the the Lou Holtz show folded up. I felt from the start that they were in a bad location. Bert Wheeler is now with Bing Crosby for the full run of his Radio show.
    Saw the Three Stooges on the Colgate Comedy hour last night (TV) same as ever + spitting & slapping. Brought back memories to me.
    We are leaving for England end of January, due in London Feb. 3rd. so as you can imagine I am up to my neck in preparation, a million & one things to do. Thanks for the Van Hoven routine, but he did that in England for several years, I remember it well, he was terrific. We are doing an act in sketch form, a plot with a situation, like the shorts we used to make. The one we did last time was "Getting A Driver's License". In this one we are forced into robbing the Chief of Police's house, but luckily all ends well, so as you see the routines you mention would'nt fit for us, but I appreciate your kind thought anyway Betty. Yes, Babe is going too. Our name L&H is magic over there, it's amazing after all these years, they don't even want to remember you over here.
    I guess you read of the Joan Bennett Scandal, is'nt it a mess? The Franchot Tone affair & many other Hollywood scandals, & I was blamed for just picking my nose. The trailer idea sounds good, hope it will grow into a Big business for you.
    All for now Betty, my best to Wayne & wish you both a Merry Xmas & a Happy Prosperous New Year.
    With kind thoughts,
                Sincerely as ever:-
Stan Signature

Note from the Editor

Joan Bennett (1910–1990) was an American film actress who also achieved success later in life as a television actress. In 1951, Joan's husband, producer Walter Wanger, shot and injured Bennett’s agent, with whom she had begun an affair, and the resulting scandal damaged her career. Wanger spent two years in prison for the offense, but he and Bennett remained married until 1965.



1,000th U.S.O. Overseas Unit

U.S.0. Camp Shows achieved another milestone this week when it put into rehearsal its 1,000th overseas entertainment unit. Since it was organized in October of 1941, Camp Shows, sole purpose of which is to provide “live” entertainment for the Armed Forces throughout the world, has performed its task as well as any professional manager.
    According to the records, the first overseas tour was headed by Jane Pickens, first performer to sign for out-of-the-State work; Ray Bolger, Mitzi Mayfair, Chico Marx, Stan Laurel and Oliver Hardy. This unit entertained our forces in the Caribbean area.
    This week, the Overseas Unit 1,000 takes the Camp Shows banner to the fighting front of Korea. The troupe, appearing in a bill called “Footlight Festival,” includes the dance team of Cabot and Dresden, Lee Noble, Chester Dolphin, Kistmet, Patricia Crowley, Debbie Hadley, Peggy Saunders, Lola Jay and Nat Rand.
    Henceforth, Camp Shows activities are expected to take on greater scope, in some way being even more diversified than in World War II days. Starting with Unit 1,000, all overseas groups departing during the winter maneuvers at Camp Drum will do week-end shows, two on Friday and two on Saturday before leaving the United States.
    This latest arrangement is in answer to urgent requests from the Department of Defense to bring morale-boosting entertainment to the men undergoing the rigors of the winter war games.

—The New York Times
    (December 18, 1951)

Stan Watermark